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Opana (Oxymorphone) 40mg

$8.50
Opana is a strong semi-synthetic opioid based analgesic (pain killer). It is widely used to relieve moderate to severe pain. It is also used as pre-operative medicine to reduce anxiety and maintenance of anesthesia as an analgesic in obstetrics.

Opana (Oxymorphone) 30mg

$6.40
Opana is a strong semi-synthetic opioid based analgesic (pain killer). It is widely used to relieve moderate to severe pain. It is also used as pre-operative medicine to reduce anxiety and maintenance of anesthesia as an analgesic in obstetrics.

Definition of Opana (oxymorphone)

Opana (oxymorphone) is a prescription pain medication that belongs to a class of drugs known as opioids. It is used to manage moderate to severe pain and is typically prescribed for short-term use. Oxymorphone is a synthetic opioid which is more potent than morphine and produces similar effects, such as pain relief, sedation, and a sense of euphoria. It is available in tablet and extended-release (ER) form. Opana ER is intended for around-the-clock treatment of pain and not for use on an as-needed basis.

Medical uses of Opana

Opana (oxymorphone) is primarily used to manage moderate to severe pain that may occur due to injury, surgery, or chronic conditions such as cancer. It is typically prescribed for short-term use, as prolonged use of opioids can lead to dependence and addiction.

Opana ER is intended for around-the-clock treatment of pain and not for use on an as-needed basis. It is a extended-release form of the drug, which allows for a slower release of the medication into the body, providing pain relief for an extended period of time.

Opana is a powerful opioid and it is only prescribed when other pain management options have failed or are not tolerated by the patient. It is also not recommended for use in patients who have a history of opioid abuse or addiction.

It is important to note that the use of opioids, including Opana, carries the risk of addiction, overdose, and other serious side effects, and should be used only under the guidance and supervision of a healthcare provider.

Potential risks and side effects

Opana (oxymorphone) is a powerful opioid medication that carries a risk of addiction, dependence, and overdose. The prolonged use of opioids, including Opana, can lead to physical dependence, which means that the body becomes accustomed to the presence of the drug and withdrawal symptoms may occur if the medication is stopped abruptly.

Potential side effects of Opana include:

  • Drowsiness and sedation
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Dizziness and lightheadedness
  • Itching and sweating
  • Dry mouth
  • Headache
  • Confusion
  • Mood changes

Opana can also cause more serious side effects, such as:

  • Respiratory depression: which is a decrease in the rate or depth of breathing and can be life-threatening
  • Low blood pressure
  • Seizures
  • Allergic reactions

Opana may also interact with other medications and substances, such as alcohol and sedatives, which can increase the risk of serious side effects and overdose.

It is important to consult with a healthcare provider to discuss the benefits and risks of using Opana and to use the medication only as directed.

History of Opana

Opana (oxymorphone) is a synthetic opioid pain medication that was first developed in the early 20th century. It was first approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2006 as a treatment for moderate to severe pain.

Opana was initially marketed as a safer alternative to other opioid painkillers, such as OxyContin, due to its extended-release formula. However, the drug was found to be highly addictive, and its abuse led to the opioid epidemic in the United States.

In 2012, the FDA requested that Endo Pharmaceuticals, the manufacturer of Opana ER, remove the medication from the market due to concerns about abuse and overdose. However, the company decided to discontinue the medication voluntarily.

After the discontinuation of the original version of Opana, the FDA approved a new version of the drug in 2017, which was designed to be more difficult to crush or dissolve, in an effort to reduce the potential for abuse.

Opana has played a significant role in the opioid epidemic in the United States, with many individuals becoming addicted to the drug after using it for pain management. The opioid epidemic has led to a significant increase in overdose deaths, and efforts have been made to address the issue, such as increasing access to addiction treatment and tightening regulations on opioid prescriptions.

How Opana works?

Opana (oxymorphone) works by binding to specific receptors in the brain and spinal cord known as opioid receptors. These receptors are involved in the regulation of pain, pleasure, and reward. When Opana binds to these receptors, it triggers a cascade of chemical reactions that lead to the inhibition of pain signals, and the release of neurotransmitters that produce feelings of pleasure and euphoria.

Opana is available in both tablet and extended-release (ER) form. The extended-release formula is designed to release the medication slowly into the body over an extended period of time, providing pain relief for an extended period of time.

Opana is considered a powerful opioid, and its effects are similar to those of other opioids such as morphine. It is typically used to manage moderate to severe pain, and it is only prescribed when other pain management options have failed or are not tolerated by the patient.

It is important to note that while opioids like Opana can be effective in managing pain, they can also be highly addictive and carry a risk of overdose, particularly when taken in higher doses or for prolonged periods of time. Therefore, it is important to only use Opana as directed by a healthcare provider and to be aware of the potential risks and side effects.

Dependence and addiction potential

Opana (oxymorphone) is a powerful opioid medication that carries a risk of dependence and addiction. Prolonged use of opioids, including Opana, can lead to physical dependence, which means that the body becomes accustomed to the presence of the drug and withdrawal symptoms may occur if the medication is stopped abruptly.

Addiction, on the other hand, is a more severe form of dependence that involves the compulsive use of a drug despite negative consequences. Individuals who are addicted to Opana may continue to use the drug despite knowing that it is causing harm to their health, relationships, or other areas of their life.

The risk of addiction is higher in individuals who have a history of substance abuse or addiction, but anyone who uses opioids for an extended period of time may develop an addiction.

Opana, like all opioids, can produce feelings of euphoria and pleasure, which may lead to recreational use of the drug. With time, the brain adapts to the presence of the drug, and higher doses are needed to achieve the same effects, which can lead to addiction.

It is important to use Opana only as directed by a healthcare provider and to be aware of the potential risks and side effects. If you or someone you know is experiencing signs of addiction, such as compulsive drug-seeking behavior, it is important to seek professional help as soon as possible.

Overdose and withdrawal symptoms

Opana (oxymorphone) carries a risk of overdose, which occurs when an individual takes a large enough dose of the drug to cause severe harm to the body or death. The risk of overdose is higher in individuals who are physically dependent on the drug or who have developed an addiction.

Symptoms of an Opana overdose may include:

  • Slow or shallow breathing
  • Bluish lips or fingers
  • Extreme drowsiness or unconsciousness
  • Cold or clammy skin
  • Confusion or agitation
  • Seizures or muscle spasms
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Cardiac arrest

If you suspect that someone has overdosed on Opana, it is important to seek medical attention immediately. In case of an overdose, the drug naloxone can be administered to reverse the effects of opioids and save the person’s life.

Withdrawal symptoms occur when an individual who is physically dependent on Opana stops taking the drug abruptly.

Withdrawal symptoms can vary depending on the severity of the addiction, but they can include:

  • Anxiety and irritability
  • Insomnia and restlessness
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Muscle aches and cramps
  • Increased heart rate and blood pressure
  • Cold flashes and goosebumps

Interactions with other medications and substances

Opana (oxymorphone) can interact with other medications and substances, which can increase the risk of serious side effects and overdose.

Opana can interact with other opioids, such as morphine or fentanyl, as well as sedatives, such as benzodiazepines, which can increase the risk of respiratory depression.

Opana can also interact with certain medications used to treat mental health conditions, such as antidepressants and antipsychotics, as well as with medications used to treat sleep disorders, such as hypnotics. These interactions can increase the sedative effects of the medication and increase the risk of drowsiness and confusion.

Opana can also interact with medications used to treat high blood pressure, heart disease, or seizures, as well as with antibiotics, antivirals, and antifungals, which can affect the way the body metabolizes the drug and increase the risk of side effects.

Alcohol, which is a central nervous system depressant, can also increase the sedative effects of Opana, and can increase the risk of respiratory depression, drowsiness, and confusion. It is important to avoid alcohol while taking Opana.

It is important to inform your healthcare provider of all the medications and supplements you are currently taking before starting treatment with Opana. They can advise on the appropriate dosages

Treatment and Support

Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is a widely used approach that involves the use of medications to manage withdrawal symptoms and cravings. Medications such as methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone can help reduce the intensity of withdrawal symptoms and make it easier to stop using the drug.

Behavioral therapies, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and contingency management, can help individuals understand the underlying causes of their addiction and develop strategies to cope with triggers and stressors.

Support groups, such as Narcotics Anonymous, can also provide a sense of community and a safe space to share experiences and receive support from others who have been through similar experiences.

Inpatient or residential treatment programs can provide a structured and safe environment for individuals to detoxify from the drug and receive intensive therapy and support.

Outpatient treatment programs, which allow individuals to continue living at home while receiving treatment, can also be effective for some individuals.

It’s important to note that, as addiction is a chronic disease, recovery is not a one-time event but a process that requires ongoing support and management. It is crucial to have an aftercare plan in place to maintain long-term recovery.

It’s also important to have a medical professional monitor the treatment and recovery process, as withdrawal symptoms can be dangerous and sometimes fatal if not properly managed.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Opana (oxymorphone) is a powerful opioid medication that is used to manage moderate to severe pain. However, its use carries a significant risk of dependence and addiction, particularly when taken for prolonged periods of time or in higher doses.

Overdose is a serious risk associated with opioid use, and it is characterized by shallow breathing, drowsiness, confusion, and unconsciousness. Withdrawal symptoms, such as anxiety, insomnia, and muscle aches, can occur when an individual who is physically dependent on Opana stops taking the drug abruptly.

Opana can also interact with other medications, substances, and alcohol, which can increase the risk of serious side effects and overdose.

Medication-assisted treatment, behavioral therapies, support groups, and inpatient or outpatient treatment programs can be effective in helping individuals overcome addiction and achieve long-term recovery.

It is important to be aware of the risks and side effects associated with Opana use and to only use the medication as directed by a healthcare provider. If you or someone you know is experiencing signs of addiction, it is important to seek professional help as soon as possible.

Frequently Asked Question (FAQ)

Q: What are the potential risks and side effects of Opana? 

A: The potential risks and side effects of Opana include dependence, addiction, overdose, and withdrawal symptoms. Opana can also interact with other medications and substances, which can increase the risk of serious side effects.

Q: What is the risk of addiction with Opana? 

A: The risk of addiction with Opana is significant, particularly when taken for prolonged periods of time or in higher doses. Individuals who have a history of substance abuse or addiction are at higher risk, but anyone who uses opioids for an extended period of time may develop an addiction.

Q: What are the symptoms of an Opana overdose? 

A: Symptoms of an Opana overdose may include slow or shallow breathing, bluish lips or fingers, drowsiness or unconsciousness, cold or clammy skin, confusion or agitation, seizures or muscle spasms, nausea and vomiting, and cardiac arrest.

Q: How is addiction to Opana treated? 

A: Treatment for Opana addiction and dependence typically involves a combination of medication, behavioral therapy, and support. Medication-assisted treatment, behavioral therapies, support groups, and inpatient or outpatient treatment programs can be effective in helping individuals overcome addiction and achieve long-term recovery.